How You Can Make Tons of Money Recycling Precious Metals in 2015

How You Can Make Tons of Money Recycling Precious Metals in 2015

We have reached a tipping point where tremendous numbers of products that contain precious metals are being discarded or recycled. If you are an alert investor or speculator, you can buy quantities of them at rock-bottom prices, recycle them, and earn a big return on your investment. Some of these products include...

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Open Things Up, Find Precious Metals, Make Money

In the last five years, I have been in two old buildings that contained large old safes that could not be opened. One building was a small inn in New Hampshire, the other was a former plumbing supply store in New Jersey. In both instances, the buildings had recently been purchased, so the safes and their contents belonged to the new owners. But those owners didn’t seem to be in a big hurry to bring in a locksmith to open the safes to determine what was inside.

If I owned those safes, I would have been in a hurry. What were the new owners waiting for? I have no idea, because “closed boxes” sometimes contain surprisingly valuable items. And “closed boxes” can come in many forms . . .

As this photo shows, you never know what precious metal objects you might find in your house that Specialty Metals can recycle into extra money for you.

Clutter Lying Around the House

A cousin of mine who was cleaning up his basement storage shelves found a box that he and his wife had never opened. When he looked inside, he discovered a set of silver-plated candlesticks from a prestigious store. Where had they come from? Was it a wedding present that he and his wife had never bothered to open? He and his wife didn’t know, but they did know that they had something on their hands that was worth money.

Small Items Hiding in Drawers

When I open my dresser drawer and review what is rolling around in there, a lot of items appear worthless. But I also see a set of very old tuxedo-shirt studs that came from “somewhere” and look like gold. There is also an old set of cufflinks, which came from the same “somewhere.” I could use some cash for holiday spending. I should send them to a trustworthy, qualified gold refiner and recycler like Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners for testing.

Inherited Items

I know people who inherited “stuff” from parents or grandparents, and who have never quite gotten around to taking a close look at it or having it appraised. They have just put it all aside. It can be a good and very profitable idea to review what you have inherited, especially if you are lucky enough to have acquired items like coin collections or chests of jewelry. If you open them up, you might find one or two small items that are worth a lot of money.

Items Hidden in Older Homes

This is a long shot, I know. But I also know that when some renovations were being completed in the old house where I grew up, we found a collection of old books hidden behind a false wall by the basement stairs. They were not worth much of anything. But if you have an old house, it could be a good idea to look around. In the old days, it seems that people liked to hide valuable things in houses.  That newer patch of cement in the basement floor could be hiding something. So could a floorboard in your bedroom. Remember, metal detectors can be used indoors as well as outdoors. If you have an old home, you could turn up something quite valuable.

Keys to Safety Deposit Boxes

If you have inherited the personal possessions of an older relative who has passed away, have you taken a close look at his or her keys? If any of them are stamped with the name of a bank, you could have the opportunity to discover things of value like gold jewelry that your relative wanted to protect in a safety deposit box.

A Note on Unclaimed Safety Deposit Boxes

If you search online for “unclaimed bank safety deposit box auctions” you will probably find them in your state. Don’t get your hopes up too high, however, that you will buy an unopened deposit box and discover piles of gold in it. The problem is that in virtually all cases, those boxes have been opened by the bank so that their contents could be turned over to the state agency that attempts to return unclaimed property to its owners. The items that go on sale at auction are those that could not be returned – and if they are worth a lot of money, they have already been “discovered” and will be selling for high prices.

Find Something? Call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners

Even small items that contain precious metals can be worth money – money that could come in very handy at the time of year when the holiday shopping season is about to begin. Why not contact Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 to learn more?

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Need Extra Cash for the Holidays? Why Not Recycle Your Precious Metals Now?

Do you tend to leave a certain number of things unfinished? I know that I do, because I sometimes procrastinate. One example? I have two old snow tires that are leaning against the back wall of my garage. They don’t fit on my current car. I really should figure out what to do with them – sell them on Craigslist or take them to my mechanic to see if he can give me a few dollars for them maybe – but I never quite get around to it. I also have some nice old picture frames that I could cut down and use on some pictures that I have in the house. But do I do it? Of course not.

Many of our customers send us sterling silver flatware, silver-plated tableware and hollowware as shown above for us to refine and recycle.

Many of our customers send us sterling silver flatware, silver-plated tableware and hollowware as shown above for us to refine and recycle.

Another Class of Things You and I Should Attend to

Those are just a few examples of some of the loose threads that need to be tied up in my house and my life. Are you anything like me? If you are, then you have left some things undone too. So you and I should turn our attention to “loose threads” and put some extra dollars in our wallets right now, just in time for holiday spending. 

I’m referring to loose threads that involve precious metals that could potentially be refined and recycled. In my life, they include . . . .

  • A box of old silver-plated tableware that my wife and I inherited from somewhere, about 10 years ago. We don’t like it, we don’t use it, but it’s still sitting around. If I got it together to send it to a top silver refinery like Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners, I would probably get some cash for it, just in time for the holidays. How much money would I get? I don’t know, but Specialty Metals could tell me in no time at all. And just in case you thought Specialty Metals only deals with businesses, you would be wrong. They work with individuals like you and me, too.
  • A weird little gold charm that I inherited from my parents after they died. Maybe it belonged to my grandfather? It looks sort of like a dragon, only it has a little compartment in its stomach where it is possible to keep  . . . a pill, maybe? Not too sure what. I don’t know whether this strange little item is 18K or 24K gold or just what, but a top gold refinery like Specialty Metals could tell me in no time flat. Who knows, it could be worth a very nice chunk of change. If you look in your dresser drawers, you might find something similar.
  • A large old gold-toned salad fork and spoon that I ended up with somehow. They’re in a drawer in my dining room. I don’t even know where I got them. I doubt that they are made of gold. It’s much more likely that they are silver with some kind of thin gold plated finish on them. Are they worth $5 or $500? I have no way of knowing. But I do know that I can find out very fast by sending them to Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners to be tested. And again, it would be good to have a little extra cash for the holidays.

What Are You Procrastinating About?

It’s one thing to be stalling about old snow tires, and another thing to be procrastinating about recycling items that could potentially contain very valuable quantities of precious metals.

So with the holidays coming up soon, today could be the day for you and me to get moving. Let’s call 800-426-2344 to turn the stuff we’ve been stalling about into cold cash.

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Why You Can Make More Money than Ever by Recycling Silver

It might surprise you to learn that until the middle of the 20th century, silver was not widely regarded as a precious metal. Prices were so low back then – in fact, historical data from The Silver Institute shows that silver was selling for only about 75¢ per troy ounce in 1950. Such giveaway prices explain why silver was used so extensively as plating and in pure form. The price of silver has fluctuated widely since then, but has been on a steady rise. By 1999, it was selling for nearly $10. And these days, it is trading for between $18-$20 on the London Fix.

Shown: Photo of shipment of silver-plated scrap sent to Specialty Metals by a customer to be refined and recycled for the best prices on silver.

Shown: Photo of shipment of silver-plated scrap sent to Specialty Metals by a customer to be refined and recycled for the best prices on silver.

To summarize: once silver was cheap, today it is not. That situation has created an opportunity, because older silver and silver-plated items that date from the days of cheap silver can be found just about anywhere – in estate sales, antique stores, auction houses, and elsewhere. If you can find those items and recycle the silver they contain by sending them to a silver refinery like Special Metals Smelters and Refiners, you can end up with a lot of money thanks to of today’s high silver prices.

What kind of older silver items should you be looking for?

Smaller Antique Items, Including

  • The handles and tips of walking canes
  • Letter openers
  • Lighters and lighter cases
  • Paperweights
  • Buttons
  • Belt buckles
  • Cigarette and cigar cases
  • Eyeglass frames and cases
  • Commemorative plates and medals
Many of our customers send us sterling silver flatware, silver-plated tableware and hollowware for us to refine and recycle.

Many of our customers send us sterling silver flatware, silver-plated tableware and hollowware for us to refine and recycle.

Tableware, Including

Adornments, Including

  • Jewelry of all kinds
  • Hair pins and combs
  • Pocket watches, fobs and chains

Home Decorations, Including

  • Candlesticks and candelabras
  • Picture frames
  • Light fixtures and switch plates
  • Mantle and wall clocks
  • Trophies

How to Cash In on Today’s Higher Silver Prices

Gather up your silver items and call Specialty Metals Smelters and refiners at 800-426-2344. Your collection of small silver and silver-plated items could be worth much more than you think.

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Why Big Dollars Could Be Hiding in Small Quantities of Silver Tableware

Why Big Dollars Could Be Hiding in Small Quantities of Silver Tableware

Did you just inherit a chest of silver or silver-plated tableware or a silver-plated tea service or punchbowl? If so, you could have something quite valuable on your hands.

Image showing sterling silver flatware, silver-plated tableware and hollowware that Specialty Metals can refine and recycle profitably for your company.

Silverware is different from other recyclables, because a lot of value can often be found in smaller quantities. If you want to recycle automotive catalytic converters for the platinum they contain, for example, you’ll need to have at least 500 of them before recycling becomes worthwhile. The same is true for gold-bearing printed circuit boards. Although they contain gold, only a large quantity of escrap will yield a significant amount of money.

Why Silverware Is Different

First, silverware is often collectible. If you want an example of just how much one chest of silver can be worth, take a look at this Victorian silver desert service made in 1848. It includes 12 dessert spoons, 12 dessert forks, and 12 dessert knives. They come displayed in their original wooden chest. The set is currently being offered for sale by M. S. Rau Antiques in New Orleans. The price? $19,850.

Second, even small quantities of silverware can contain significant amounts of silver. If the set that you have is not valuable to collectors (consult a qualified appraiser to be sure), the silver alone can be worth a lot of money. Silver is currently trading at nearly $20/troy ounce on the London Fix. If you send a sample to Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners to be tested, you could be in for a very pleasant surprise. Call us at 800-426-2344 to learn more.

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Let’s Get Wet - What Liquids Contain Valuable Precious Metals?

Certain liquids contain quantities of precious metals that can be recycled. But before we discuss what those liquids are, let’s state something important . . .

Only larger quantities of liquids that contain precious metals are generally worth recycling!

Photo of skids of drums filled used manufacturing fluids containing traces precious metals that can be recycled profitably by Specialty Metals.

If you have a gallon or two of the liquids that are described below, you should not expect to receive a lot of money for recycling them. (In such cases, your responsibility is to dispose of them in accordance with local environmental laws.) But if you have larger quantities – skids of cans of metallic paint, drums of sludge – then it is worth calling us at 800-426-2344 to discuss recycling them.

Now that we’ve gotten that issue out in the open, let’s take a look at some liquids that could contain valuable quantities of precious metals.

Used Fluids from Electroplating Processes

If your company electroplates in tanks, the electrolytic fluid from them could contain quantities of the gold, silver, or other metals that you are plating onto other metals.

Unused Chemicals that Contain Silver or Other Metals

Some chemical liquids that are used in production processes contain trace elements of valuable metals. You might think that chemicals used in photo processing would contain quantities of silver, but silver halide is found in negatives and film, usually not in processing fluids. Still, it is worth reviewing the unused chemicals that you have to see whether they contain silver.

Sludge Left Over from Plating Operations

If your organization operates large-scale gold-plating or silver-plating operations in tanks, the sludge that accumulates in them (or “downstream” in other tanks that capture the sludge) could contain gold or silver that can be profitably recycled. Again, let’s point out that only large quantities of sludge are generally worth recycling – just a gallon or two won’t yield large enough quantities of precious metals.

Unused Metallic Coatings and Paints

If you have large quantities of decorative or industrial metallic coatings, they could be worth recycling. Remember, however, that the old saying “all that glitters is not gold” applies. A gold-hued or silver-hued metallic paint could contain more reflective mica powder and colorings than real gold. You’ll need to read the ingredients to see if any real precious metals are there or, in some cases, send a sample to a top precious metals refinery like Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners to let us take a closer look.

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Do You Own Silver-Plated or Pure Silver Items? This Online Encyclopedia Helps You Identify them Fast

Did you just inherit a pair of silver salad serving spoons from your grandmother? Or did you just acquire a large quantity of older silver or silver-plated cutlery?

Image showing sterling silver flatware and hollowware that Specialty Metals can refine and recycle profitably for your company.

No matter how few or how many silver items you own, you probably have a lot of questions on your mind. Yes, the pieces that you own are stamped with little markings on the underside of their handles. But what do they mean? How can you identify the company that made the items that you own? How can you tell whether they are pure silver or silver-plated? And most important of all, is your silver likely to be worth a lot of money or only a few dollars?

If you’re asking questions like those, you need to know about 925-1000.com’s Online Encyclopedia of Silver Marks, Hallmarks, and Maker’s Marks, available for instant research online. It’s a vast online reference to silverware patterns, markings, manufacturers, and more. Best of all, it contains thousands of images of the markings that are stamped on the silverware items that you own. It may take a little time and digging to identify just what you have. But the good news is, you are almost certain to learn more about your holdings.

Here are some of the features of this remarkable online resource for owners of silver items.

  • A library of images of marks and hallmarks and stampings from America, Great Britain, France, Italy, and many more countries.
  • A database of manufacturing dates and critical information about silverware that was produced by the world’s most important manufacturers, including Tiffany, Lunt, and more.
  • A collection of images of silverware patterns that helps you identify what you own.
  • Links to dozens of online resources and books about silver.

What Is Your Silverware and Silver-plated Tableware Worth?

The Online Encyclopedia of Silver Marks, Hallmarks, and Maker’s Marks doesn’t list values for the pieces of silver tableware that it has catalogued. That’s a job for an appraiser who specializes in silverware.

If you complete your research with an appraiser and determine that the real value of the items you own is contained in the silver that they contain, call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344. We’ll be happy to discuss your silverware with you and explain how we can help you realize the greatest return by letting us refine and recycle your silver and silver-plated items.

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Why Money Can Be Found in Your Used Electroplating Supplies

Does your company electroplate thin layers of one metal onto another? Or have you recently acquired quantities of used e-plating equipment or scrap from another company? In either case, you could have something of value on your hands.

Shown: Electroplating tank scrap that customers have shipped to Specialty Metals for the recycling of precious metals at the best prices.

Shown: Electroplating tank scrap that customers have shipped to Specialty Metals for the recycling of precious metals at the best prices.

Here are the answers to some questions about how electroplating works and where dollars could be hiding.

Why Is Electroplating Done?

Electroplating can be used to beautify metals or protect them from corrosion. Remember the “chrome cruiser cars” of the 1950s, with acres of chrome-plated trim? Similarly, jewelry and tableware can be coated with silver or gold to make them more beautiful. Electroplating is also used to make metals less likely to oxidize – that’s why “tin cans” are actually steel cans that have been electroplated with tin so that the steel will not react chemically with the can’s contents. In addition, durable metals like platinum and palladium are sometimes plated onto softer metals to make them harder or abrasion-resistant.

How Is Electroplating Done?

Let’s look at the most basic way of coating one metal onto another – in an electroplating tank. First, that tank is filled with liquid, called the electrolytic bath, which contains a solution that contains the metal like platinum that will be used as a coating. The object to be plated is immersed in the bath, and connected to the negative terminal of a source of electricity that will flow through the bath. (In other words, the object to be plated becomes the cathode.) Next another piece of metal – one that will not be plated – is connected to the positive terminal and immersed in the liquid. (It becomes the anode.)

When electricity flows through the bath, electrodes of the metal that will become the plating (i.e., silver) adhere to the object that is being plated.

That basic process can vary, depending on the nature of the metal that will form the plating, the object to be plated and other variables. Sometimes, for example, the anode can be made of the metal that will be used as a coating; electrodes from it will flow to the object to be coated. But even though there are variations, that’s basically how tank e-plating works.

Why Can Used E-plating Materials and Supplies Be Worth Money?

There are several reasons. Let’s take a closer look.

  1. Tanks, filters, mesh screens, piping and other equipment can have become coated with quantities of the gold, palladium or the other precious metals that have been used as platings.
  2. If a tank has been used to apply alloys of precious metals, the “used” cathodes can still contain quantities of precious metals that can be quite valuable.
  3. The used electrolytic fluid, and any “sludge” that accumulated on the bottom of tanks or elsewhere, can contain quantities of the precious metal that was used as a plating.

Want to Know What Your Used E-Plating Materials are Worth?

Several factors can determine how much value you have in used electroplating supplies – the kind of metal that was used as plating, for example. If you have quantities of these potentially valuable recyclables on hand, why not call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344. Tell us what you have and we’ll be pleased to help you claim the hidden dollars that could be hiding in it.

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Finding Value in Cutlery from the Golden Age of Silver Electroplating

Did you know that there was a “golden age” of silver plating that lasted from about 1880 until 1960? It was a time when production of silver-plated tableware was at an all-time high. If you own a large quantity of silver-plated knives, forks, and spoons from those years, you could have something valuable. In the early years of that “golden age” especially, manufacturers often applied thicker layers of silver plating than were common in later years.

Why the “Golden Age” of Silver Electroplating Happened

Image showing sterling silver flatware, silver-plated tableware and hollowware that Specialty Metals can refine and recycle profitably for your company.

During the second half of the nineteenth century, a new kind of upper class emerged. Its members were not royalty or landed gentry, but magnates who had amassed fortunes during the industrial revolution. As they built lavish homes for entertaining, they needed quantities of fine sterling silver tableware. A number of manufacturers started smelting silver and making vast quantities of tableware to meet the demand.

Then the twentieth century dawned and the number of middle-class Americans grew dramatically. They also wanted to entertain, and they also wanted to put out elegant-looking silver tableware for their guests. The problem was, they often couldn’t afford pure silver place settings. For these upwardly mobile people, the answer was silver-plated tableware. It looked as elegant as the “real thing,” unless guests flipped it over to squint at the fine print that indicated that it was only silver-plated. Many companies rushed in to produce silver-plated flatware, including F.B. Rogers, Lunt, Meriden Britannia, Middletown Plate, and the International Silver Company. 

It was also a time when new markets suddenly evolved for other products too. The Ford Model T offered ordinary people – not millionaires – a chance to own cars. It was before the age of television, so sales of radios and record players surged. It was the golden age of piano manufacturing in America too – a time when the piano, not the flat screen TV, often functioned as the home entertainment center.

Enter Stainless Steel

One drawback of silver-plated tableware was that it tarnished, just like the fully silver tableware that it imitated. Keeping a set of it shiny could be a labor-intensive hobby. That’s one reason why people quickly began to buy stainless steel cutlery as soon as it was introduced.

One milestone? In 1961, the tableware manufacturer Oneida improved the process of manufacturing tableware from stainless steel. Oneida began to market stainless steel tableware alongside silver-plated. Within 10 years, the company was manufacturing much more stainless tableware than silver-plated. Other makers of stainless entered the market too – companies like Liberty, Reed & Barton, Lunt, Williamsburg, as well as a number of Asian manufacturers – and the sales of silver-plated tableware decreased even more. The golden age of silver plating had come to a close.

What Is Your Silver-Plated Tableware Worth?

Pure silver tableware – not silver-plated – is worth much more than silver-plated, for several reasons. The first, of course, is that it contains more silver. But there is also the fact that some silver patterns from certain manufacturers are very much in demand by collectors. If you’re lucky enough to have pure silver tableware that is in a sought-after pattern, it could be worth far more than the value of the silver metal it contains. If you own a quantity of pure silver cutlery – or even a few pieces – it’s worth your while to contact a qualified appraiser to find out what it is worth.

The odds are lower that silver-plated items will be sought-after collectibles, but it does happen. That’s why – again – you should speak with an appraiser before deciding to scrap or recycle items that you own.

If you have a large quantity of silver-plated items – a collection of hundreds or thousands of pieces - you should contact an expert silver refinery. To learn more, call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 and we can explain how you can recycle your silver-plated tableware profitably.


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Why Recycling Plating Tank Scrap Can Pay You More than You Expect

If you work directly in manufacturing processes that include electroplating, you already know how tank electroplating works. If you’re an executive at a company where electroplating is done, you might not know the details. Here’s a review of the basics, because what you don’t know could be costing your company money that the best precious metals recycling companies can add back into your bottom line.

Shown: Photo of electroplating tank scrap that customers have shipped to Specialty Metals for the recycling of precious metals at the best prices.

Shown: Photo of electroplating tank scrap that customers have shipped to Specialty Metals for the recycling of precious metals at the best prices.

How Does Tank Electroplating Work?

Two metallic parts are immersed in a fluid called an electrolyte, which contains dissolved metal salts and other chemicals that allow charged atoms to pass through it. One of the immersed metal parts is the anode, which is made of the gold, silver, or other metal that you want to apply to the surface to be plated. The other immersed metal part, the cathode, is the part that you want to be plated.

Once everything is set up, an electrical current is run through the tank. That causes atoms in the anode to dissolve in the electrolyte solution and find their way to the cathode, where they adhere.

That’s the basic info. It’s a simple process that has been used to apply metal platings to everything from jewelry to belt buckles for years.

What Kinds of Metals Can Be Electroplated?

Commonly plated metals include gold, silver, platinum, rhodium, palladium, osmium, and iridium. Alloys can be applied via electroplating too. They include alloys containing gold, cadmium, cobalt, copper, and silver.

Why Do Plating Tanks Get Contaminated?

In an ideal world, the gold or other metal that you want to apply would jump right off your anode, swim straight to what you are plating (your cathode), and stick only there. But in the real world of plating processes, it doesn’t happen quite that neatly. The rare metal that you are applying doesn’t only adhere to the piece you are trying to plate. It’s kind of ornery, and tends to adhere to the side of the tank, to drain pipes, to filtering screens, to sensors that are immersed in the tank, and to the walls of the tank itself.

The result is that the tank, and those components, can become plated with residue that contains significant quantities of the precious metal you are using. That residue might not look like the bright shiny gold or silver or platinum that you are applying, but it might contain significant amounts of those rare metals anyway. The same can be true of the electrolytic fluid that you use in your plating; when you dispose of it, you could be disposing of valuable precious metal at the same time.

The result? When tanks, drain pipes, and other components become sufficiently contaminated after use, the quality of your platings can become compromised. Instead of only plating your parts with the precious metal you intend to, other elements that have contaminated your electrolytic fluid can stick to them too. At that point, you are faced with some choices. You could scrub and clean the tanks, which needlessly discards quantities of precious metals. Or you could call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 to discuss the used tank scrap and other plating components that you have. We’re ready to recommend strategies that will help you recoup the value in the precious metals you have been using in your plating processes.

How Can You Find Hidden Dollars in Precious Metal Plated Scrap?

You could have traces of precious metals on your tank surfaces, on filter screens, in drain pipes, in accumulations of sludge, or on immersed sensors. And if you use a brush plating process in which an electrically charged metal brush is used to apply precious metal to the pieces you want to plate, your used plating brushes can contain precious metals too. Unless you call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 to discuss your used tank scrap and other recyclables, you could be throwing dollars away.

Why It Pays to Find a Refiner for Silver, the “Forgotten” Precious Metal

Shown: silver for fabrication of jewelry, silverware, electronics, X-rays, sputtering targets and other scrap Specialty Metals recycles and refines.

Shown: silver for fabrication of jewelry, silverware, electronics, X-rays, sputtering targets and other scrap Specialty Metals recycles and refines.

When you think about recycling precious metals, you probably think first of gold, palladium, platinum, rhodium and other “high end” precious metals. You’re smart to think that way. After all, some of them can be worth $1,000 per ounce or even more.

You’re probably not thinking about silver. It’s often the “forgotten” precious metal - the one that you think about last. Silver doesn’t sound sexy. Its price is currently hovering at about $20 an ounce, so it’s worth much less than many other precious metals. But the fact is, a silver refiner can probably write you much bigger checks for your silver-bearing scrap recyclables than you expect, for a simple reason.

You probably have more silver than you believe – possibly a lot more of it.

In addition to jewelry and silverware, it’s widely used in:

  • Automotive components
  • Quantities of plated buttons, trophies, incentive rewards and other easy-to-overlook items
  • Coated plastics
  • Electronic devices of all kinds
  • Gauges and measuring devices
  • Mirrors and machines that contain them
  • Quantities of silver, gold, aluminum, or other metallic paint
  • Rechargeable and other batteries of many kinds – many contain valuable quantities of silver cadmium
  • Silver salts and other unneeded chemicals
  • Silver-plated metal scrap
  • Used or unneeded sputtering targets
  • Thermocouples
  • Unused photographic, medical and dental films of all kinds – some of which could be lying around because they are no longer needed
  • Unused welding supplies
  • X-ray equipment and supplies

And don’t forget silver alloys...

In addition to silver cadmium (mentioned above), many other alloys contain silver too. Sometimes it’s easy to overlook them, because their names don’t even mention silver. They have names like Argentium, Billon, Electrum, Goloid, and even Shibuichi. Don’t overlook their value.

Not sure what you have or whether it contains silver that you can turn into dollars? Call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 and our expert representatives can help you discover the real value of your scrap and unused silver-bearing materials.