Is This a Good Time to Invest in Silver, Gold, Platinum and Rhodium Bullion?

Is This a Good Time to Invest in Silver, Gold, Platinum and Rhodium Bullion?

Do you like to buy silver, gold, platinum and rhodium bullion bars and coins?

If you do, you are making a prudent investment choice for these reasons . . .

  • You know exactly what you are buying, because they are precisely measured, and issued by governments and reliable companies that are generally trustworthy.

  • You can gauge whether your bars and coins are fairly priced, because you can compare their weight to current trading prices. (Note, however, that in most cases bullion bars and coins are sold at prices that are slightly higher than current trading prices.)

  • They are convenient investments – easy to buy. Plus, they are packaged in sealed plastic containers that protect them, and which can be easily stored in safety deposit boxes, safes and other secure locations.

  • You are all but assured that the precious metals they contain are pure.

  • You can enjoy volume discounts, because many dealers will reduce the price per unit if you buy 10, 20, 50 or more at one time.

Okay, those are good reasons. But do they mean that you are making the most profitable investment possible in precious metals if you buy bars and coins? We’ll return to that question in a minute. But first, let’s consider a different question.

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If Rhodium Is Trading at Sky-High Prices, Why Are Rhodium-Plated Items So Cheap?

If Rhodium Is Trading at Sky-High Prices, Why Are Rhodium-Plated Items So Cheap?

As we write today’s post, rhodium is trading at $2,620 on the London Fix. And investors are buying 1 oz. rhodium bullion bars for up to $2,900.

But if you shop online, you will discover that rhodium-plated rings, earrings and chains are selling for $20.00 or less. That is not a typo – they really are selling for surprisingly low prices. What is going on? How can that be?

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What Are the Platinum Group Metals?

What Are the Platinum Group Metals?

Chances are that you only find small quantities of the valuable secondary platinum group metals (palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium) hiding in recyclable items that you think are made only of platinum. How can you tell if these rarer metals are present?

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All about Rhodium, the Other Precious Metal

Just about everyone knows the basic facts about gold, silver, and even platinum. But if you mention rhodium to most people, they’re apt to say, “Oh yes, it’s another of the precious metals, correct?”

Shown: the periodic table symbol for Rhodium, element 45, which is very valuable and can be recycled and refined by Specialty Metals.

Those people are right. Rhodium is indeed one of the precious metals. And “precious” is the right word, because rhodium is trading at nearly the price of gold on the London Fix. But there’s a lot more information you should know about rhodium too – information that can help you refine this “other” precious metal for quite a lot of money.

Here’s a primer of useful information about rhodium.

 

What’s the history of rhodium?

Portrait of William Hyde Wollaston, who first extracted Rhodium from ores containing platinum and palladium in 1803.

Portrait of William Hyde Wollaston, who first extracted Rhodium from ores containing platinum and palladium in 1803.

In 1803 a British scientist named William Hyde Wollaston used a chemical process to extract rhodium from ores that also contained platinum and palladium. Because the metal is reddish in color, it was named rhodium from the Greek word rhodon, which means “red.” For a long time, the metal wasn’t widely used, but about 100 years after its discovery, it found its way into laboratory devices that measured high temperatures. Rhodium’s “big break” came in the mid-1970s, when rhodium-containing catalytic converters were first used to reduce the pollutants in automobile exhaust emissions. Since then, the demand for rhodium – both new and recycled – has remained strong.

Is rhodium an element?

It is. It’s element 45 on the periodic table.

How rare is rhodium?

Rhodium is one of the rarest elements. It is estimated to make up only 0.0002 parts per million of the earth’s crust. The largest known concentrations of it are in the Ural Mountains in Russia, in South Africa, and in Ontario, Canada. Because rhodium is both scarce and expensive to extract from ores, its value is almost certain to remain quite high.

What are rhodium’s unique properties?

Rhodium is hard, chrome-like in appearance, and very resistant to corrosion.

What is rhodium used for?

Until recently, rhodium was used extensively as thin plating on jewelry. But because the process of rhodium plating creates large quantities of acids and other noxious byproducts that must be discarded, it seems that the age of rhodium plating is on the wane. The demand for rhodium for automotive catalytic converters, however, is not about to lessen. That demand, coupled with the scarcity of rhodium in nature, helps assure that you can continue to receive high payouts for rhodium that you recycle using a top precious metals refiner like Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners.

How much is rhodium worth?

Rhodium is currently trading for about $1,415/troy ounce on the London Fix. For comparison, gold is trading at around $1,300 (give or take the day!), and platinum for about $1,428.

Where can I find rhodium that I can recycle?

If you have 500 or more automotive catalytic converters, we can profitably recycle the rhodium that they contain, as well as their palladium and platinum. In addition, here are some other rhodium-containing items that can return high value to you…

  • Platinum-rhodium alloy mesh, wire, sheet, rods, foil, and tubes
  • Platinum-rhodium thermocouple wire
  • Lab ware containing platinum group metals, including laboratory crucibles, evaporation dishes, electrodes, tongs, loops, and mesh screens
  • Rhodium and rhodium-plated rings, watches, and other items of jewelry

Want to Know More?

If you own any of the rhodium-bearing items that are described in today’s post, call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344. We want to help you recycle the rhodium that you own. And we know that you will want to convert their value into cash.

Related Posts:

How to Eliminate the Middleman and Make More Money from Your Used Catalytic Converters
What Precious Metals are Inside Catalytic Converters and What Are They Worth?
Non-Automotive Catalytic Converters Contain Precious Metals Too
Smarter Recycling: Don’t Overlook the High Value of Noble Metal Thermocouples
What Happens when Platinum Meets Rhodium?

5 Things You Need to Know about Recycling Platinum-Plated Jewelry

Platinum-plated jewelry has unique properties that are often misunderstood. If you own quantities of platinum-plated jewelry or platinum plate scrap, here is some critical information you need to know about recycling it . . .

1. Platinum-Plated Objects Must Be Refined, Not Reformed

Shown: Jewelry and jewelry scrap containing platinum and other platinum group metals like rhodium that our customers have sent in for recycling and refining.

Shown: Jewelry and jewelry scrap containing platinum and other platinum group metals like rhodium that our customers have sent in for recycling and refining.

Unlike karat gold, sterling silver and many other kinds of jewelry, platinum-plated items cannot be reworked or redesigned. Because the platinum has been applied as a plating, any attempt to heat, hammer or reshape a piece will result in a disastrous failure.

2. Platinum-Plated Rings Cannot Be Resized

Any attempt to stretch them a size larger will result in the same kind of catastrophic failure that we described just above. Plus, platinum –plated rings cannot be cut and remanufactured into smaller sizes. So if you have a number of platinum-plated rings on hand, you need to send them to a qualified platinum refinery like Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners for recycling.

3. “Platinum Plated” Can Mean Many Things

It does sound like “platinum plated jewelry” can only be one kind of material. But in reality, platinum can be plated onto gold, silver, and even a soft metal like copper. Obviously, 100 pounds of platinum-plated silver jewelry will be worth much more than 100 pounds of platinum-plated copper items. The only way to know how much your items are worth is to send them for testing at an experienced platinum recycling company.

4. Platinum-Plated Jewelry Can Tarnish and “Turn Your Skin Green”

It is a myth that anything coated with platinum cannot tarnish. If the layer of platinum is too thin, it can wear away and expose the metal underneath. The result? An “untarnishable platinum-plated” piece of jewelry that tarnishes, changes color, or irritates your skin.

5. When You Look at Platinum-Plated Jewelry, You Might Not Be Seeing Platinum

Platinum-plated metals can sometimes be plated with an additional thin layer of rhodium, which is even harder and more corrosion-resistant than platinum itself. Sometimes this additional layer of rhodium has not been disclosed by the manufacturer, and the piece will only be labeled “platinum-plated.” How can you tell? You need the services of an expert platinum recycler like Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners.

Call Specialty Metals to Learn More about Platinum-Plated Jewelry

Prices for platinum are on the rise, so you need to know all you can about recycling this precious metal. Call us at 800-426-2344 to learn more.

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Platinum Sterling: What You Need to Know about this Precious Alloy
What Happens when Platinum Meets Rhodium?
An Invitation to Jewelers, Pawnbrokers and Other Jewelry Professionals to Partner with Our Precious Metals Refinery

What Happens when Platinum Meets Rhodium?

Platinum is a valuable precious metal. So is rhodium. So what happens when they are combined?

The result is a valuable alloy that has some very useful properties and abilities, including stability at high heat. That could explain why alloys of the platinum and rhodium have found their way into a number of devices and components that are widely used in testing, aerospace and production lines.

Shown: platinum rhodium electrode mesh, which Specialty Metals can recycle and refine for the best precious metal prices.

Shown: platinum rhodium electrode mesh, which Specialty Metals can recycle and refine for the best precious metal prices.

If you have some of the following items on hand, they could contain quantities of the two metals that can return a lot of dollar value to you after they are recycled.

Platinum-Rhodium Thermocouple Wire

Thermocouple wire is widely used in industrial applications, most often where temperatures on a production line are monitored from remote locations. Some of these applications include production line welding, ceramics manufacturing, and many chemical processes.

Platinum-Rhodium Labware Used in Testing

These items can include crucibles, tongs, stands, probes, and other pieces of testing equipment. Even when such items are discolored or worn, they still contain valuable quantities of platinum and rhodium.

Platinum-Rhodium Catalysts Used in Chemical Production

These applications are far-ranging and fascinating. Screens made of platinum-rhodium alloy are used to produce nitric acid, fine glass fibers for use in fiber optics, and even artificial silk. If you encounter a batch of those screens, it is well worth contacting Special Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 to find out more about having them analyzed.

Automotive and Industrial Catalytic Converters

These are the applications where alloys of platinum and rhodium have been most widely used. If you operate an automotive recycling center, a muffler shop, or other business where you accrue a quantity of catalytic converters, don’t let their value slip away.

And let’s not forget platinum-rhodium-tungsten alloys . . .

These highly heat-resistant alloys are finding their way into a number of aerospace applications, and can be worth a lot if recycled. Have questions? Call us at 800-426-2344 to learn more.

Related Posts:

Why Used Thermocouple Wire Is a Top Candidate for Profitable Recycling
Smarter Recycling: Don’t Overlook the High Value of Noble Metal Thermocouples
Bright Shiny Platinum Could Be Hiding in Your Dented and Dirty Old Labware
What You Need to Know about Recycling Alloys of Precious Metals
How to Eliminate the Middleman and Make More Money from Your Used Catalytic Converters

How Much Platinum Does Your Platinum Jewelry Really Contain?

If you have pieces of platinum jewelry that you’re thinking of recycling, how much platinum do they contain? Here’s some information from the Federal Trade Commission that can help you know.

Don’t Rely on Information that Is on the Packaging

Even if your platinum items are packaged in boxes or other packaging that states that they are made of platinum, don’t believe it unless the items themselves are stamped with markings like “platinum,” “plat” or “pt.”

Understanding the Markings on Pieces of Platinum Jewelry

Shown: Jewelry and jewelry scrap containing platinum and other platinum group metals that Specialty Metals recycles and refines.

If an item is simply stamped as “platinum,” “plat,” or “pt.” with no other markings, that means that it contains at least 95% pure platinum - if it was legally sold in America.

If it is stamped with a marking like “850Plat,” that means that it contains 85% pure platinum.

Sometimes stampings will indicate the other metals that are present in the jewelry too. For example:

  • 800 Pt. 200 Pd. indicates 80% pure platinum and 20% palladium
  • 750 Pt. 250 Rh. Indicates 75% pure platinum and 25% rhodium
  • 600 Pt. 350 Ir. Indicates 60% pure platinum and 35% iridium

What Other Metals Could Platinum Jewelry Contain?

According to the FTC, jewelry that is marked “platinum” could contain:

  • Other platinum group metals such as iridium, osmium, rhodium, or ruthenium
  • Base metals such a copper or cobalt

Not Sure What You Have?

If you own a quantity of jewelry that you think is made of platinum but which has no markings, what does that mean? There are several possibilities. It could have been manufactured for sale in other countries, for example. It could have been made before current labeling standards were enforced. Or it could have been improperly stamped by the manufacturer.

If your items are not marked, you would be well advised to call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners, a qualified platinum refiner, for testing. Call 800-426-2344 to learn more.

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How to Get Top Dollar for Silverware and Gold Jewelry
What Is Karat Gold and How Can You Find Out What Yours Is Worth?
What Is a Troy Ounce

 

 

Bright Shiny Platinum Could Be Hiding in Your Dented and Dirty Old Labware

Maybe you just bought a building or a company where a testing lab was located. Or maybe you work at a university and need to dispose of labware that is no longer used in your science and engineering programs.

Photo of platinum crucible scrap containing platinum alloy, which Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners can recycle for your company.

Before you order a dumpster and toss it all, give us a call. Those old crucibles, tongs and other mismatched stuff might look like they’re made of stainless steel or even aluminum, but chances are that they are made of platinum, which is currently trading at over $1,400.00/troy ounce.

Here are some items that you should be on the lookout for.

  • Crucibles, dishes and lids
  • Evaporation dishes
  • The long testing containers known as “boats”
  • Testing electrodes including Fischer, Winkler, Wölbing and Schöniger electrodes*
  • Ignition dishes, in which materials to be tested are ignited
  • Tubes that connect testing tanks
  • Wire wool, perforated disks, meshes, and filters
  • Tongs, tweezers, and spatulas used to handle materials that are being tested

* The mesh in these electrodes contains platinum

Not Sure What Precious Metals You Have that Can Be Recycled?

It’s easy to overlook the potential value that could be hiding in some of the items described above – who would think that a jumble of dirty old metal mesh contains platinum and rhodium and could be worth hundreds of dollars? If you would like to learn how much your used laboratory gear could be worth, give us a call at 800-426-2344.

Related Posts:

Recycling and Refining: The Profitable Way to Dispose of Used Laboratory Equipment
New Medical Technologies Spur a Boom in Platinum Use
Demand for Precious Metals Increases with Widespread Healthcare Changes
Why Smart Veterinarians are Recycling the Platinum from their Testing Supplies

Smarter Recycling: Don’t Overlook the High Value of Noble Metal Thermocouples

If you own used industrial equipment that was used in high-temperature settings, it is almost certain that you are in possession of a quantity of used noble metal thermocouples. What are they, and how much are they worth?

Photo showing the kind of gas appliance that uses a thermocouple wire that contains valuable precious metals that can be recycled and refined.

Here’s what you need to know.

First, What Is a Thermocouple?

Let’s start with the basics. Here’s the explanation that we recently ran in a post on this blog Interested in Thermocouples and Thermocouple Wire? Why Not Read Up Online?:

“A thermocouple is made from two wires that are made from different kinds of metals. They are connected at one end – the `junction.’ When that connection is made, voltage is generated; that voltage can be measured by equipment that is located at the other ends of the two wires. And here’s where things get interesting, because when temperatures change at the junction, the amount of voltage that’s generated changes too.”

What Are Noble Metal Thermocouples and Do They Contain Platinum?

Noble metal thermocouples are so called because they contain quantities of platinum and rhodium. They are usually classified by their manufacturers as Type B, R, or S thermocouples. They are used to measure or monitor temperatures in a high range between about 1800ᵒ Fahrenheit (982ᵒ Centigrade) through about 4200ᵒ Fahrenheit (2300ᵒ Centigrade). 

Base metal thermocouples are more common, and less valuable. They typically contain nickel alloys. They are classified by their manufacturers as Type E, J, K, N or T thermocouples. You are most likely to find them in equipment that is used to measure or monitor temperatures below about 1800ᵒ Fahrenheit (982ᵒ Centigrade).

How Can You Tell What Kind of Thermocouples You Have?

As I noted at the beginning of today’s post, noble metal thermocouples are found where temperatures run high – in the range of 1800ᵒ to 4200ᵒ Fahrenheit. Those settings can include production lines, testing laboratories, firing kilns – anywhere high temperatures need to be measured or monitored. One example? Robotic arc welding equipment that must shut down if temperatures start to run too high.

In some cases, you can learn whether you have precious metal thermocouples by reading the documentation that accompanies the equipment. (Don’t have the specs? Don’t forget that you can often learn them by looking at a manufacturer’s product brochures or specifications online.) In some cases, thermocouple specifications are stamped onto small plaques that the manufacturer attached to the equipment. And in some cases, the thermocouple’s classification (Type B, R, or S, for example) will be stamped somewhere on the thermocouple itself, or on gauges or valves that are attached to it.

How Much Are Your Recyclable Platinum and Rhodium Thermocouples Worth?

Precious metals like rhodium and platinum can be recycled by the best platinum refiners very profitably – platinum for more than $1,400 per troy ounce, and rhodium for more than $1,000. If you call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344, we will be happy to discuss the potential value of your used, recyclable thermocouples.

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Why Thermocouple Wire Is a Top Candidate for Profitable Recycling
How to Claim the Cash that’s Hidden in Used Equipment Containing Thermocouple Wire
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Non-Automotive Catalytic Converters Contain Precious Metals Too

As we’ve noted in previous posts, automotive catalytic converters contain platinum, palladium, rhodium, nickel, and other metals that can be profitably extracted by precious metals refineries. If you have 500 or more catalytic converters that you would like to recycle, you could get a surprisingly large amount of money in return.

Let’s open our lens a bit wider today, because catalytic converters are not found only in cars. They are also used in a variety of commercial and industrial applications. And because industrial-grade catalytic converters are generally larger than those that are used in cars, they can contain even larger quantities of precious metals that can be recycled and refined.

Where to Look for Industrial Catalytic Converters

Catalytic Converters like this one for a hospital diesel generator can contain large quantities of precious metals like platinum, palladium and rhodium. Image courtesy of Governor Control Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Catalytic Converters like this one for a hospital diesel generator can contain large quantities of precious metals like platinum, palladium and rhodium. Image courtesy of Governor Control Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  • Portable generators
  • Road grading and paving equipment
  • Industrial-grade mowing equipment
  • Fork lifts and equipment-moving vehicles
  • Tree removal and property clearing equipment
  • Drilling and well-digging machines
  • Pile drivers and bridge-building machinery
  • Cranes and lifting equipment
  • Construction equipment
  • Air compressors
  • Portable heaters used at construction sites
  • Diesel-and gas powered production line and manufacturing equipment

If you have the opportunity to collect used catalytic converters from those sources, you should. Like the smaller converters recycled from automobiles, they contain valuable quantities of precious metals. If you’ve been overlooking this resource, call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 to learn more.

Related Posts:

What Precious Metals are Inside Catalytic Converters and What Are They Worth?
How to Eliminate the Middleman and Make More Money from Your Used Catalytic Converters
How to Pick the Best Precious Metals Recycling Company

Plating Primer: How Do Sputtering Targets Work?

We’ve written on this blog previously about how valuable your used sputtering targets can be. Today, we’d like to give you an overview of how the sputtering process works to apply platings to a variety of surfaces. The more you know, the better the chances are that you won’t overlook valuable quantities of precious metals that you could have on hand in your used sputtering targets.

What Is Sputtering?

Shown: One type of used sputtering target, which can contain gold, silver, platinum, palladium and rhodium, and can be refined and recycled by Specialty Metals.

Shown: One type of used sputtering target, which can contain gold, silver, platinum, palladium and rhodium, and can be refined and recycled by Specialty Metals.

It’s an electronic process that deposits thin films of metals or other materials onto a variety of surfaces. Most often, sputtering is used to apply thin platings onto silicon wafers, solar panels and display screens.

How Does Sputtering Work?

Sputtering is done in a vacuum chamber into which an inert gas is introduced – in most cases, argon. Two items are placed into that chamber: the item to be plated, and the “target” that contains the material that will be applied. A negative electrical charge is applied to the target, causing some of the electrons that it contains to travel to the material to be coated. Presto! You’ve got a thin film of plating right where you want it. But note that the use of the term “target” can be confusing, since it is the source of the plating material that is used, not its final destination.

What Metals or Other Substances Can Be Delivered from Sputtering Targets?

Sputtering targets are now being used in a many industries for the first time. As a result, targets are being used to apply cadmium, chromium, gold, indium, iridium, palladium, platinum, rhodium, silver, tungsten, zirconium, and even more materials that can be used as coatings or platings.

Is That All There Is to It?

No, that is just a very basic summary. In fact, a number of different sputtering technologies are used today, including magnetron sputtering, ion-assisted sputtering, and reactive sputtering. If you are not sure which kind of sputtering is taking place on your production line, speak with your production engineers, with the manufacturer of your sputtering production equipment, or with the supplier of your sputtering targets.

How Much Are Used Sputtering Targets Worth?

That can vary, depending on the value of the metal that you are using as platings, the presence of secondary metals in the sputtering targets that you use, the strength and efficiency of your sputtering applications, and more. The one way to be sure is to send your used sputtering targets to a qualified precious metals recycler for testing. To learn more, call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344.

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How Solar Panel Manufacturers Let $MILLIONS Slip through Their Fingers
Don’t Throw Dollars Away! How to Mine the Hidden Value in Used Sputtering Targets

What Precious Metals are Inside Catalytic Converters and What Are They Worth?

If you have a quantity of 500 or more used automobile catalytic converters on hand, Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners is ready to recycle them for you and pay you top dollar for the platinum and other precious metals they contain.

Photo of catalytic converter containing platinum, palladium and rhodium which can be recycled and refined for best prices at Specialty Metals.

Before you contact us or ship us used catalytic converters, you might want to take a few minutes to learn more about what catalytic converters are and how they work. The more educated you are, the better you will understand why recycled catalytic converters can be so valuable.

Here’s a quick course…

  • What do they do? It’s simple. The exhaust that comes directly out of internal-combustion engines still contains quantities of unburned fuel, oil and other substances. Catalytic converters are small chambers where those unburned substances are combined with oxygen and burned more completely. The result? The exhaust that flows away from the catalytic converter and out the tailpipe is much “cleaner” than what came out of the engine.
  • When did they start being widely used? It all started back in 1975, when the U.S. government began to regulate the pollutants produced by cars, trucks, buses, and other vehicles.
  • Are they used on most kinds of internal-combustion engines? Yes, they are – you’ll find them on gas engines and diesel engines. You will not find them, however, on propane-powered engines or (of course) on electric cars. But guess what – hybrid gas/electric cars like the Toyota Prius and Chevrolet Volt still use catalytic converters to reduce the emissions from the gas-burning part of the hybrid setup.
  • What metals do they contain? Platinum is the most widely used. You could also find palladium, rhodium, cerium, manganese, and nickel.

What Structures Are Inside a Catalytic Converter?

Most of us know what the outside of catalytic converters looks like. But what’s inside? Basically, there’s a honeycomb-like structure where the secondary combustion takes place, triggered only by the high temperature of the exhaust gases that are leaving the engine.

Want to look? Here’s an excellent YouTube video that lets you look inside one without getting your hands dirty.

 

Unlocking the Dollars from the Precious Metals that Catalytic Converters Contain

Call Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344 to discuss the converters that you have on hand. We’ll help you understand the converters that you have and explain their potential value. If you have 500 or more to recycle, you could be sitting on a surprisingly valuable quantity of precious metal.

Related Posts

How to Eliminate the Middleman and Make More Money from Your Used Catalytic Converters
Palladium Recycling: Don’t Overlook the Great Value of this Little-Understood Rare Metal
How to Pick the Best Precious Metals Recycling Company

 

 

Don’t Throw Dollars Away! How to Mine the Hidden Value in Used Sputtering Targets

You know exactly why you’re buying the sputtering targets that you use in your manufacturing processes. You’re using them to apply thin films of alumina, zirconia, indium, tin, zinc, silicon, chromium, titanium, or some other material. So you buy targets that contain the material you want and that’s pretty much all they contain, right?

Shown: scrap sputtering targets, which can contain gold, silver, platinum, palladium and rhodium, and can be refined and recycled by Specialty Metals.

Shown: scrap sputtering targets, which can contain gold, silver, platinum, palladium and rhodium, and can be refined and recycled by Specialty Metals.

No, wrong. As you already know, the sputtering targets you’re buying never contain just the one metal or substance you’re looking for. They usually contain a number of metals, elements, and other substances too – including gold, platinum, silver, palladium and rhodium! The material you need for your production processes is probably commixed with other metals or chemicals, affixed to a backing plate, and possibly bonded to that plate with a thin layer that could contain a precious metal or other materials that you don’t even know about. (All that could help to explain why the sputtering targets you buy are never guaranteed to be 100% pure.)

Putting that Hidden Value Back in Your Bottom Line

The potential hidden value in your used sputtering targets could lie in the words we used in the paragraph just above: “other materials that you don’t even know about.” Unless you know exactly what hidden precious or platinum group materials your used sputtering targets contain, you run the risk of discarding or recycling them without even knowing that you are tossing dollars away.

Maybe you think that couldn’t be true, because you’re returning your used sputtering targets to their manufacturer, which refurbishes them. That’s responsible of you, and probably a good decision. But it could also be that your supplier sells you sputtering targets once, then refurbishes them, and then sells them to you again. From a certain perspective, that means you could be buying the same trace elements of precious metals again and again, instead of claiming their dollar value. 

How can you find out how much money you can reclaim by recycling your used sputtering targets? Unless you have a fully equipped metallurgical lab on your premises to run tests, you probably can’t do it on your own. But you can call Specialty Metal Smelters & Refiners today at 800-426-2344 to discuss the kind of sputtering targets that you use and to get a preliminary opinion about what trace elements they could contain. Our testing lab can then quickly run tests to determine if they contain valuable materials like gold that you shouldn’t be tossing away.

Related Posts:
Use an Organized Recycling Program for Sputtering Targets to Boost Your Company Profits by 10% or More
7 Strategies to Cut the Costs of Sputtering Targets and Precious Metal-bearing Manufacturing Supplies
Plating Primer: How Do Sputtering Targets Work?

Welcome to the Specialty Metals Blog


Be sure to check here periodically for the latest info on precious metals, including gold, silver and platinum group metals rhodium, palladium and platinum. We’ll try and update periodically with news and information about the metal markets and other current events that could effect the markets.