Why the Ugliest Platinum Holiday Gifts Are the Most Beautiful of All

Why the Ugliest Platinum Holiday Gifts Are the Most Beautiful of All

Let’s say that you want to give your favorite person a really special present for the holidays – something that stands out. Let’s also assume that you want to give a present that is made of platinum, because platinum is especially beautiful and memorable.

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Are Sputtering Targets Your Best Buy in Platinum Scrap Today?

Are Sputtering Targets Your Best Buy in Platinum Scrap Today?

Are you interested in making money in platinum scrap? There are plenty of reasons you should be. The biggest could be that the new tariffs on items imported from China seem poised to raise the cost of platinum-containing items.

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Easy-to-Miss Places where Platinum-Plated Metals Can Be Found

If you say the words “platinum plated metal” to many people, most of them will think first of jewelry. That makes sense, because platinum is so commonly used to add a bright and corrosion-resistant surface to rings, pins, watches, and other items of jewelry.

But platinum is electroplated onto other metals for many reasons too – and unless you know what they are, you could fail to recognize some of the platinum-plated items that you could recycle profitably using a qualified platinum smelter and refiner like Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners.

Let’s take a look at some sources of platinum-plated scrap that you could be missing . . .

Shown: Aerospace Scrap like this can be an excellent source of platinum, palladium, silver cadmium and gold

Shown: Aerospace Scrap like this can be an excellent source of platinum, palladium, silver cadmium and gold

Aerospace and Aeronautics

There could be big dollars hiding in aerospace scrap. You’ll find recyclable platinum in thermocouples, contacts, gauges, and many other places.

Electrodes

Platinum-plated electrodes are used in the manufacturing of fertilizers, chemicals, explosives and more products than you might expect.

Electrical Utilities and Industries

Platinum-plated contacts and cables are widely used in industries that manufacture electrical components – and in electrical generators too.

Purification Systems for Liquids of Many Kinds

Platinum-coated surfaces are found in devices that use electricity to purify water, oil, industrial chemicals, and other liquids.

Photo of catalytic converter containing platinum, palladium and rhodium which can be recycled and refined for best prices at Specialty Metals.

Photo of catalytic converter containing platinum, palladium and rhodium which can be recycled and refined for best prices at Specialty Metals.

Catalytic Converters

Platinum-plated components are commonly found in catalytic converters that are used to treat the emissions from automobile, truck, and industrial engines. If you’re wondering how to refine platinum from catalytic converters, call us.

Medical Devices

Most people know that platinum plating is used in coronary testing catheters, implantable defibrillators, and pacemakers. Fewer people know that platinum can also be found in cables and contacts that run between pieces of medical equipment, or even within large medical devices.

Shown: scrap platinum sputtering targets can be a surprisingly lucrative source of platinum.

Shown: scrap platinum sputtering targets can be a surprisingly lucrative source of platinum.

Electroplating Operations

It is kind of ironic – but true – that platinum coating is often applied to anodes that are used to electroplate other metals. Used sputtering targets are another potentially lucrative source of platinum.

Want to Know More?

If you have a quantity of platinum-bearing scrap or old metal parts from one of the industries or applications described in today’s post, call us today at 800-426-2344. We’ll be happy to lead you to quantities of valuable platinum that could be hiding right under your nose.

Related Posts:

How to Claim the Cash that’s Hidden in Used Equipment Containing Thermocouple Wire
What Precious Metals are Inside Catalytic Converters and What Are They Worth?
Why Money Can Be Found in Your Used Electroplating Supplies
Recycling Opportunity: More Medical Equipment Is Getting Scrapped than Ever Before

Prospector Finds Huge Ancient Sputtering Target Buried in the Mohave Desert

Wheeler McClintock, a solitary 78-year-old prospector, noticed something funny while he was riding his Burro Molly across the Mohave Desert in central California last October.

This prospector in this photo may not have struck it rich, but you can turn your used platinum sputtering targets into gold at Specialty Metals.

This prospector in this photo may not have struck it rich, but you can turn your used platinum sputtering targets into gold at Specialty Metals.

“It was just weird,” McClintock told us in a recent call. “I looked down at Molly and thought I saw that all the brass rivets on her collar were shining brighter than usual. I jumped off to get a closer look and was pretty doggone sure that they were coated with platinum. Didn’t they used to be brass? Then I pulled out my tin cup and canteen to wet my parched whistle and golly day, they were coated with platinum too. Same with my glasses, my pickaxe and spade, my beer can opener, my earring and even the fillings in my teeth. I thought I was going crazy or about meet my maker in the great beyond.”

McClintock rushed to the county Assay Office to stake his claim. “They wouldn’t let me, even if I used one of the `Other’ forms that they use for UFO stuff,” McClintock recalls. “They wanted more info.”

Under the cover of a dark moonless night, McClintock rode Molly out into the desert again, armed with a $79 metal detector and a long metal spike. Returning to the site of his first plating, he stuck the spike into the ground, hit a metal object buried about a foot underground, then continued out in wider and wider circles while probing and testing at every stage. “I was trying to get the measurements of this thing, whatever it is,” he explained.

Finally, he had his answer. He had found a huge disk, about 100 yards in diameter, buried underground. “The Assay Office let me stake my claim, based on that information,” McClintock explains. “But since I had no idea what I had really found or what to do with it, I called the best precious metals refiners in the US, Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners at 800-426-2344, to ask what I had on my hands. This real nice feller was happy to help me.”

“We’re not yet absolutely sure yet what Mr. McClintock has discovered,” states one of the precious metals recycling experts from Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners. “Whatever it is, it is functioning as a huge platinum sputtering target, probably because of radioactive uranium deposits underneath. That’s why any metal objects that pass over it get quickly plated with platinum.”

Where did this thing come from? It could have been created millions of years ago by a meteorite hitting the earth. Or maybe even it was left behind, or created, by a UFO when it landed. We’ll get to the bottom of it. How much is Mr. McClintock’s find worth? Nothing, sad to say, because there is really no Mr. McClintock and this story is all made up.

But weird things happen on April Fool’s Day, right? Best wishes for recycling success from all of us at Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners.

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A Brief – and Useful – History of Fool’s Gold
Don’t Throw Dollars Away! How to Mine the Hidden Value in Used Sputtering Targets
Plating Primer: How Do Sputtering Targets Work?

What You Need to Know about Recycling Used Magnetron Sputtering Targets

We’ve written about sputtering targets many times before on this blog, including this great explanation of how sputtering targets work. They can contain valuable quantities of precious metals, even after they have outlived their useful life in your coating operations.

Shown: scrap sputtering targets, which can contain gold, silver, platinum, palladium and rhodium, and can be refined and recycled by Specialty Metals.

But what about magnetron sputtering targets? Do they, like gold-bearing sputtering targets, contain valuable quantities of recyclable precious metals? Let’s take a closer look.

What is Magnetron Sputtering?

The first impulse magnetron sputtering (HPIMS) machines were introduced to the market in 2006. They are high-powered sputtering machines that are now widely used in many coating applications for one simple reason: They can apply very dense layers of thin films onto a variety of surfaces, most often ceramics, glass and plastic.

  • Magnetron technology is most often used to apply coatings to:
  • Automotive headlight housings and other reflective surfaces
  • Architectural glass
  • DVDs and CDs
  • Photovoltaic cells
  • Solar panels
  • Superconductors
  • Flat panel displays
  • Lighting surfaces
  • Medical testing devices

Magnetron sputtering machines are also sometimes used to “etch” or pre-treat surfaces that will then be coated using regular sputtering technology.

Here’s a very informative video about magnetron sputtering that was produced by Norfolk State University. If you watch until the end, you’ll see that the HPIMS equipment has been used to coat a glass slide with a thin conductive film.

What Metals Do Used Magnetron Targets Contain?

Used magnetron sputtering targets that were used to apply reflective coatings on glass most often contain quantities of silver and metal oxides, including zinc oxide, tin oxide, or titanium oxide. Yet it is worth remembering that used sputtering targets contain more than just the metals that they were used to deposit – they can contain other metals too, such as thin layers of silver or other metals that were used to bond the targets onto their substrates. If you have used sputtering magnetron targets and would like to know whether they can be profitably recycled, call the best precious metals refiners, Specialty Metals Smelters and Refiners, at 800-426-2344. We’ll be happy to help you recoup maximum dollars from the precious metals they may contain.

Related Posts:

Don’t Throw Dollars Away! How to Mine the Hidden Value in Used Sputtering Targets
Use an Organized Recycling Program for Sputtering Targets to Boost Your Company Profits by 10% or More
7 Strategies to Cut the Costs of Sputtering Targets and Precious Metal-bearing Manufacturing Supplies
Sputtering Targets: Four Great Educational Informative Videos You Can Watch on YouTube

Sputtering Targets: Four Great Educational Informative Videos You Can Watch on YouTube

If you would like to learn more about sputtering targets, you might want to spend some time searching for the term “Sputtering” on YouTube. You can get a great education quickly, thanks to dozens of excellent videos that you will find.

Here are four that we found to be very useful and informative:

Gold Sputtering Targets

This nine-minute video shows the use of a sputtering target to plate gold onto several materials, using a small desktop-sized sputtering machine.

Intro to Sputtering Process to Create Clear, Conductive Coatings

A very good 11-minute video that illustrates how sputtering targets can be used to apply coatings to glass.

Home Built Desktop DC Magnetron Sputtering Machine

This 10-minute video doesn’t have a narration, but the video still teaches a lot about how sputtering targets are used to apply metallic coatings.

Magnetron Sputtering Cathodes from Angstrom Sciences

Sputtering occurs when an ionized gas molecule is used to displace atoms of a specific material. This four-minute video describes how Angstrom Sciences, a leading manufacturer of magnetron sputtering technology, manufactures magnetron sputtering targets. Highly educational.